A production still from the movie 47 Metres Down of Mandy Moore and Claire Holt surrounded by sharks

47 Meters Down Too Deep

47 Meters Down is an intense thrill ride that keeps you interested with anticipation. Sharks are a common fear for a lot of people, but what makes this film even scarier than something like Jaws is that the sharks hide in the dark. Within the depths of the pacific ocean, light begins to fade the deeper you go.

The film is about Two sisters who go on vacation in Mexico to get away from their personal troubles. Feeling a bit daring, they accept an invite from two boys to go shark cage diving on an unregulated boat. Something goes wrong in the middle of raising the cage back up and the two girls go crashing down to the bottom of the ocean, no longer attached to the boat. Trapped in a shark cage at the bottom of the ocean with less than an hour of oxygen left, the two girls struggle to communicate with the surface as great white sharks begin to circle.

It’s a simple and yet well executed film. The movie itself isn’t fantastic by any means, but for those who have a passion for the ocean, such as myself, I found this film very interesting and it kept my attention. For a film that takes place mostly in one location, I felt it was done well.

20180327200047879

Underwater films, or just water in general films, are not easy on the cast and crew and I have to imagine that director Johannes Roberts put actresses Mandy Moore and Claire Holt through the ringer in this one. However, both actresses seemed to enjoy and embrace this treacherous production.

You almost sort of meditate when you’re underwater. I find myself just being really quiet and sort of going in my own head, either thinking about the scene, or thinking about life. But, it’s interesting. You’re sort of just transported to almost a completely different frame of mind.”

– Mandy Moore

3

I imagine that’s what it’s like being in a womb, just floating around. That’s why babies like to stay in there so long. It’s really tranquil and 90% of this shoot has been absolutely pleasant and really fun down there and then 10% is either exhausting or really cold.”

– Claire Holt

Keep Exploring
The Hiawatha impact crater is covered by the Greenland Ice Sheet, which flows just beyond the crater rim, forming a semicircular edge. Part of this edge (top of photo) and a tongue of ice that breaches the crater’s rim are shown in this photo taken during a NASA Operation IceBridge flight on April 17, 2018.
Meteorite Crater Discovered Under Greenland Ice
%d bloggers like this: